Brush sculpting by air: Kill mesquite and not much else

Another year of research has added to the list of wildlife-valued plants that tolerate spraying with Sendero® herbicide.

If you ever thought you couldn’t aerially spray mesquite because you wanted to save surrounding woody plants for wildlife, think again. You can now sculpt brush by air. 

The research verifies the unusual selectivity of Sendero in aerial applications. Sendero offers a consistent, high level of control on mesquite. But it’s gentle on most plants of value to wildlife.

LESS MESQUITE, MORE DIVERSITY

In research trials before its introduction, Sendero applied at 28 ounces per acre posted mesquite rootkills of 60 percent to 93 percent two years after treatment. It averaged 77 percent, but researchers noticed most other woody plants in the plots showed little or no damage, says Dr. Charlie Hart, market development specialist for Corteva Agriscience™.

So during 2013, 2014 and 2015, Hart and university cooperators sprayed new plots in Central and South Texas. Among the mesquite was a wide variety of woody plants valued by wildlife. Latest results for one year after application are summarized in nearby tables.

“In general, Sendero is active on plants in the Fabaceae family. Those are legumes like mesquite,” Hart says. “Most of those plants are only of fair value to wildlife.”

Other high-value plants such as bumelia, coma, fourwing saltbush, granjeno, guayacan and vine ephedra showed little leaf and zero mortality a year after application.

 

Central Texas
Sendero® herbicide applied at 28 oz./A
Results one year after treatment*
Category Species Injury level
Tolerant Algerita, American elm, buttonbush, bois d’arc, bumelia, fourwing saltbush, hackberry, hawthorne, Hercules club, juniper, littleleaf sumac, liveoak, lotebush, Mexican plum, pricklyash, pricklypear, sand plum, skunkbush sumac, tasajillo, vine ephedra, western soapberry, whitebrush, willow, winged elm, wolfberry, yucca Less than 25% canopy reduction; 0% mortality
Moderately susceptible Catclaw acacia 25% to 75% canopy reduction; less than 50% mortality
Susceptible Mesquite, honeylocust More than 75% canopy reduction; more than 50% mortality
*Plant response may vary based on condition of the plant at time of herbicide application.
South Texas
Sendero® herbicide applied at 28 oz./A
Results one year after treatment*
Category Species Injury level
Tolerant Agarito, allthorn, amargosa, brasil, cenizo, coma, Colima, coyotillo, desert yaupon, elbowbush, granjeno, guayacan, hog plum, lime pricklyash, lotebush, Mexican olive, pricklypear, shrubby blue sage, Spanish dagger, tasajillo, Texas persimmon, vine ephedra, whitebrush, wild oregano, wolfberry, yucca Less than 25% canopy reduction; 0% mortality
Moderately susceptible Blackbrush, catclaw acacia, guajillo, huisache, kidneywood, twisted acacia 25% to 75% canopy reduction; less than 50% mortality
Susceptible Mesquite More than 75% canopy reduction; more than 50% mortality
*Plant response may vary based on condition of the plant at time of herbicide application.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Always read and follow label directions. Sendero is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. State restrictions on the sale and use of Remedy Ultra apply. Consult the label before purchase or use for full details. Always read and follow label directions.