Species Specifics: Silverleaf nightshade | R&P Steward | Corteva Agriscience

Species Specifics:
Silverleaf nightshade

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Silver Nightshade

Silverleaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium) 

Silverleaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium) is a perennial plant species that is native to North and South America. Controlling Silverleaf nightshade in your pastures is key to producing healthy forage and livestock. The plant can grow in a wide range of soil types and climatic conditions, and its hardiness allows it to outcompete native plants for resources such as water, nutrients, and sunlight.

Fast Facts

  • Silverleaf nightshade is a member of the Solanaceae family, which also includes other well-known plants such as tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplants.
  • Silverleaf nightshade is considered to be an invasive species in many parts of the world.
  • It can spread by seed or root pieces; root stocks less than one centimeter long can regenerate into plants.
  • Silverleaf nightshade can also be toxic to livestock, especially horses and cattle, if consumed in large quantities. The plant contains solanine, which is a toxic alkaloid that can cause gastrointestinal problems, neurological symptoms, and even death in severe cases.

What To Look For

The plant gets its name from the silver-colored leaves that cover the stems and branches. These leaves are thick and waxy, which helps the plant to conserve water and resist drought. The plant also produces small violet, light blue or white flowers and is one to three feet tall. Stems are sparsely covered with short yellow thorns. The leaves have wavy margins and are lance shaped to narrowly oblong. Leaves and stems have a dense silvery covering of hair.

Where It Is Found

Silverleaf nightshade prefers warm- temperate regions and often grows in disturbed soils in the Southwestern United States and Mexico. It is an invasive species that has successfully spread outside of its native range to become a noxious weed in twenty-one states in the US. It can occasionally be found even farther north than Kansas.

How To Treat It

Apply 12 to 16 fluid ounces of DuraCor® herbicide per acre or 1.5 to 2.1 pints of GrazonNext® HL herbicide per acre during bloom. Use higher rate in range when flowering or when weeds are larger. Re-treatment is necessary for total control.

Under normal field conditions DuraCor® is non-volatile. DuraCor has no grazing or haying restrictions for any class of livestock, including lactating dairy cows, horses (including lactating mares) and meat animals prior to slaughter. Label precautions apply to forage treated with DuraCor to manure and urine from animals that have consumed treated forage. DuraCor is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions.

GrazonNext® HL has no grazing or haying restrictions for any class of livestock, including lactating dairy cows, horses (including lactating mares) and meat animals prior to slaughter. Label precautions apply to forage treated with GrazonNext HL and to manure and urine from animals that have consumed treated forage. Consult the label for full details. GrazonNext HL on dry fertilizer mentions: GrazonNext HL is labeled for impregnation of dry fertilizer in the states of AL, AR, FL, GA, IA, KS, KY, LA, MO, MS, NC, ND, NE, OK, OR, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA and WA. GrazonNext HL is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. GrazonNext HL is not for sale, distribution, or use in New York State and San Luis Valley of Colorado. Always read and follow label directions.

 

 

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